Flame Out Hops

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tekknofobia
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Flame Out Hops

Post by tekknofobia »

When you add hops at flame out how long do you keep it in the kettle? Do you start cooling right away or do you let it sit for a while before cooling?

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XXXXX
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by XXXXX »

I've always thrown it in at flame-out, and immediately began cooling with an immersion cooler.
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ECH
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by ECH »

Yeah, flame out, basically dump them in at 0 mins, and start cooling immediately.

Whirlpool (which is what I normally do rather than flameout) I will cool it down to 180, and then put the hops in, and time it, usually anywhere from 10-30mins of time, stirring it about every 10 mins. And then cool it the rest of the way.

tekknofobia
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by tekknofobia »

Does whirlpool retain more aromatics since it's at a lower temperature?

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XXXXX
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by XXXXX »

I'm not sure it'd be a noticeable difference. Maybe someone else here knows better.

If aromatics are what you're after, have you considered dry hopping?
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tekknofobia
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by tekknofobia »

Just trying to understand the purpose of flame out and whirlpool additions. I understand that dry hopping is mostly for aromatics and boiling is to isomerize the acids for the IBU content. Now if flame out additions and whirlpool don't get boiled and isomerized and are not adding much in terms of aromatics then why would I want to use 1-2 oz. of hops. This is the part I struggle with. What is the gain here?

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brhenrio
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by brhenrio »

Flameout and whirlpool give flavour and some aroma while imparting very little bitterness.
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tekknofobia
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Joined: |23 Nov 2013|, 13:14
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by tekknofobia »

I see, thanks Brhenrio.

I just found this article online where the author claims not to use the mid and late boil additions. Anyone out here practices this method?

https://byo.com/article/save-hops-post-boil/

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brhenrio
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by brhenrio »

I typically have a 60 minute addition and then do not add hops until 5 minutes or less or whirlpool. I sometimes dry hop. I also no chill, so it messes with hop additions.
In the fermentor: Golden Sour, Not a Pill v2
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ECH
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Re: Flame Out Hops

Post by ECH »

tekknofobia wrote:
|21 Jan 2019|, 15:03
I see, thanks Brhenrio.

I just found this article online where the author claims not to use the mid and late boil additions. Anyone out here practices this method?

https://byo.com/article/save-hops-post-boil/
Depends on the style you are going for.

0 min additions are obviously going to impart more bitterness, because the wort is hotter (basically boiling as you shut off the heat and add hops at the same time)

Allowing the wort to cool to 180, imparts less bitterness, and more aroma and flavor because the wort isn't as hot. Some say 170, some say 160, some even do multiple whirlpool additions at different temps. All has to do with the isomerization of the hops.

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